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What are the Key Strengths?

Handwriting is a complex skill to learn and starts well before a child is ready to pick up a pencil and make marks on paper.

To develop good handwriting you need to:

1. Have good whole body strength and dexterity (Gross & Fine Motor Skills).

2. Understand direction, movement and position (Spatial Awareness & Motor Memory).

3. Remember and recall how to form the different shapes of the letters (Visual & Motor Memory).

4. Sit correctly (Gross Motor Skills).

5. Hold a pencil appropriately (Fine Motor Skills).

6. Control the pencil (Fine Motor Skills).

7. Tilt and move the paper on the desk (Gross Motor Skills & Spatial Awareness).

8. Refine letter formation and position (Fine Motor Skills, Visual & Motor Memory, Spatial Awareness & Eye Tracking).

9. Join the letters to form words (Fine Motor Skills, Visual & Motor Memory, Spatial Awareness & Eye Tracking).

All these skills and strengths are learnt and developed in stages as a child grows. A weakness in any of the Key Strengths areas affect a child’s handwriting skills.

These are the physical skill areas that a child needs for handwriting and many other everyday activities.

For handwriting we look at the following physical skills developmental areas:

The Key Strengths & physical skills needed for handwriting

The skills needed for good handwriting

Building the Key Strengths (gross & fine motor skills) for handwriting

Building the Other Physical Skills needed for handwriting

Posture Base Games to Help Improve Handwriting

For good posture the large muscle groups that support the pelvis, trunk, shoulders and arms need to work in a coordinated way (gross motor skills). The games and activities provided are suitable for pre and primary school children and help strengthen these muscles, ensuring they can sit correctly, helping to improve handwriting and making handwriting more comfortable.

Posture base games to improve handwriting

Bilateral Coordination Games to Help Improve Handwriting

Good bilateral coordination allows the body to move in an easy and well coordinated way, as both the left and right hand sides of the body are working in unison. The games and activities provided are suitable for pre and primary school children. They reinforce their body awareness and help them to move their writing arm comfortably across their body, helping to improve handwriting.

Bilateral coordination games to improve handwriting

Sensory Perception Games to Help Improve Handwriting

Sensory perception is the ability to send accurate messages to the brain when holding and touching objects. The games and activities are suitable for pre and primary school children and help to improve their sensory perception skills, enabling them to hold a pencil correctly and to use the correct pressure when handwriting and therefore helping to improve handwriting.

Sensory perception games to improve handwriting

Hand & Finger Games to Help Improve Handwriting

Dexterity of the hands and fingers, in-hand manipulation, together with strong arches of the hands allows objects to be picked up and manipulated. The games and activities are suitable for pre and primary school children and help strengthen these fine motor skills and so improve their ability to hold and use a pencil, helping to improve handwriting.

Hand and finger games for handwriting

Eye Tracking and Handwriting

Poor eye tracking skills can make handwriting very difficult, causing letter formation, spacing and positioning problems, leading to poor presentation. Often words are missed out or repeated, causing composition and legibility issues. The games and activities provided are suitable for pre and primary school children and help to develop eye tracking skills.

Eye tracking check & games

Spatial Awareness and Handwriting

Poor spatial awareness skills make handwriting difficult as it affects the ability to understand and produce the directional push and pulls required to form letters; as well as difficulties with spacing and positioning. Combined, these difficulties can cause poor presentation and possible legibility issues. The games and activities provided are suitable for pre and primary school children and help to develop spatial awareness skills. Spatial awareness skills are also developed through some of the Bilateral Coordination games.

Spatial awareness check & games

Motor Memory and Handwriting

Poor motor memory skills can make handwriting difficult as shapes and letter formation movements are often forgotten, causing letter reversals and incorrectly formed letter shapes, which can make joining a very slow process to learn. A poor and often slow handwriting style can develop as font styles are mixed and capital letters are used inappropriately. Combined, these difficulties can cause poor presentation, spelling and legibility issues. Often motor memory skills are affected by poor visual memory abilities and many activities and games that develop motor memory skills will also support visual memory development. The games and activities provided are suitable for pre and primary school children.

Motor memory check & games

Visual Memory and Handwriting

Poor visual memory skills make handwriting difficult as the ability to recall how letters look and reproduce them with appropriate spacing and positioning is partially or completely lost. This leads to poor letter formation skills, letter reversal along with spelling and presentation difficulties. Due to the nature of our visual memory and how we store that information difficulties in this area also impact on motor memory skills. Many activities and games that develop visual memory also support motor memory skills. The games and activities provided are suitable for pre and primary school children.

Visual memory check & games Top