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Flexibility Activities – to develop a more rapid and smoother tracking movement.

‘In and Out’

‘Which Finger’

Action Songs & Games – to develop awareness of different parts of the body and whether they are on the left or right, for example, ‘Simon Says’ or ‘Twister’.

Movement Songs & Games – to develop awareness of their place and position in a space, for example, ‘Going on a Bear Hunt’ or ‘Head, Shoulders, Knees and Toes’.

Directional Games & Activities – to develop understanding and language of directional instructions, turn left/right, straight on, backwards, forwards, up, down etc... Simple map work or Treasure Hunts (give verbal instructions, one at a time to start with, increase as their skill level improves).

Climbing & Crawling Activities – to develop awareness of their position, others and objects in the space. The activities can also be used to support directional language. Use small and large objects to create an obstacle course to climb over, crawl under, between, next to, on the left of or right of, behind, in front, on top, underneath, below or opposite.

Balancing Activities – to develop body awareness such as ‘Musical Statues’, ‘Statues’, ‘Tightrope Walk’ or ‘Foot Prints’ (cut out foot prints marked left & right are set out at different distances and direction to follow and stand on by the child, if they miss or wobble off track they have to start again. Once completed it is their turn to make a track for you).

Observation Activities – to help develop understanding and awareness of where and how close or far apart objects or features are in relation to one another. When drawing for instance a person, take time to look at what a person really looks like and what appears next - head, neck, shoulder trunk of body etc… Fuzzy Felt can be used the same way to create more accurately positioned scenes.

Make Patterns – to help develop placement relationships and language. Talk through the process of making the same pattern as shown on a card or already produced to be copied, for instance, the red square goes on the right of the blue square and the yellow square is to go below the blue square. Ask the child to verbalise what they see and are doing to recreate the pattern. Patterns can be created and copied with all sorts of items - beads, building blocks, lego, and shapes. As skill levels improve tessellation (a pattern of shapes that fit perfectly together) activities and square or patterned paper for colouring and creating their own pattern designs are enjoyable.

Jigsaws & Model Making – to help develop placement relationships and language. Talk through and explain how to begin the puzzle and what to look for, ask them to explain to you their method and how they are going to begin. Start with jigsaws that are suitable in size and complexity for the child, if they are too difficult they will become frustrated and unwilling to try again. Use cards showing models for them to recreate again, make sure they are of a suitable level. You could make one up so that they can pick it up and really look at it and talk through the model before having a go themselves or do it together talking through the making process (without taking over) so success on their part is assured.

Action Songs & Games – to develop awareness of how different parts of the body work together to create movement and whether they are on the left or right, for example, ‘Simon Says’ or ‘Twister’.

Movement Songs & Games – to develop awareness of how they move and which parts of the body work together for different movements, for example, ‘Going on a Bear Hunt’ or ‘The Hokey Cokey’.

Directional Games & Activities – to develop understanding and language of directional instructions - turn left/right, straight on, backwards, forwards, up, down etc... Simple map work or ‘Treasure Hunts’ (give verbal instructions, one at a time to start with, increase as their skill level improves). Climbing & Crawling Activities – to develop body movement awareness as well as supporting directional language. Use small and large objects to create an obstacle course to climb over, crawl under, between, next to, on the left of or right of, behind, in front, on top, underneath, below or opposite.

Big to Small – to help develop the motor memory for particular directional movements and shapes. Start big by using the whole body to move around the shape or letter they are trying to learn. Then steadily reduce the size of the activities until you reach the paper and pencil stage.

Really Big, set up an obstacle course which makes them move in the same directions as the pattern or letter formation would, they could walk, run, scooter or cycle the route.

Very Big, draw the letter really big on the ground with chalk, make the start point and direction of travel clear and talk them through the walk of the pattern or letter, any turns and which direction to take. Do this several times and then get the child to talk through themselves as they walk the route, perhaps even getting you to do the walk and telling you what to do. Try different ways of moving through the letter but always make sure they are moving in the right directions as needed to correctly write the letter on paper.

Big, by drawing the pattern or letter in the air using large arm movements which cross the mid-line (vertical imaginary line that runs through the middle of the chest and belly button). Talk through the actions with them, stand next to them (on their left if they are right-handed or the right if left-handed) when doing this rather than in front. This means they can watch and copy you easily if they get stuck or confused.

Getting smaller, with your finger draw the pattern or letter on their back while talking through the actions and then get them to repeat the activity on your back.

Smaller still, try drawing the pattern or letter in different media such as sand (wet or dry), finger paints or corn flour mixed in a little water to form a kind of paste. Make sure they are forming the letter correctly; make the start point and direction clear for them. It can be a good idea to let them play freely first before trying the letter or shape formation exercise.

Even smaller, now look to draw the pattern or letter on paper, letting them use whichever writing media they like paint, crayon, chalk, felt tip or pencil as long as they are holding the writing tool appropriately (age dependant). Make the starting point and direction clear for them to start with then let them do it by themselves. Once they seem confident in forming the letter move to large gapped lined paper and pencil and reduce the line gaps as their skill improves.

Encourage the child with positive comments by saying how you like the way they remembered where to start and moved in the correct direction or to cross a ‘t’ or dot an ‘i’. Elements which are not correct need to be addressed; try more positive and self-assessment style phrases such as, “next time try to…”, “Which do you think is best?”, “Why do you like that one best?”

Recall Games & Activities – to develop awareness of features to help put them into memory for recall. Objects or pictures can be used for this, talk through the important features of an object or picture with the child, if possible let them touch or use their finger to move from one feature to another. Then cover the object/picture and ask them to recall all the features they can remember. Show the object/picture again and talk through their recollections and discuss how they might be able to remember more things another time; for instance, focus on the position of things next to one another or colour.

Picture or Word Card Games - The cards are placed face down and you turn a card over, look at it, then place it back face down again in the same spot and try to find its matching pair by turning another card. If you do not find the matching pair it is someone else’s go. The idea is to remember where the cards are, so you can make a matching pair, the winner is the one with the most pairs of cards.

Kim’s Games – Place a few familiar objects under a cloth, remove the cloth so that the child can see them and study them (talk through what they are and maybe what is next to what). After about a minute cover them with the cloth; how many can they remember, can they remember colours or position. Then show them the objects again and talk through what they remembered. You could move the objects around and play again or remove an object to see if they can work out which one is missing.

Completion Games & Activities – to develop awareness of features to help put them into memory for recall. Show them a completed simple picture, shape or pattern, cover it and give them an incomplete version of the same picture, shape or pattern to complete. Then compare with the original and talk through any differences. Make the activity appropriate to their ability, too simple they will be insulted, too hard and they will feel frustrated.

What’s Missing Games & Activities – to develop awareness of features to help put them into memory for recall. Get the child to look carefully at what appears to be two identical pictures and spot the differences. The ‘Where’s Wally’ series of books and activities are fun and help to develop these skills.

Make Patterns – to help develop placement relationships and language to support the memory of the pattern. Talk through the process of making the same pattern as shown on a card or already produced; for instance, the red square goes on the right of the blue square and the yellow square is below the blue square. Ask the child to verbalise what they see and are doing to recreate the pattern. Patterns can be created and copied with all sorts of items - beads, building blocks, lego, and shapes. As skill levels improve tessellation (a pattern of shapes that fit perfectly together) activities and square or patterned paper for colouring and creating their own pattern designs are enjoyable.

Observation Activities – to help develop their observational skills; understanding where and how close or far apart objects or features are in relation to one another. When drawing for instance a person take time to look at what a person really looks like and what appears next - head, neck, shoulder trunk of body etc… Fuzzy Felt can be used the same way to create more accurately positioned scenes.

Thumbs up – to develop the tracking of moving objects with both eyes focused on the moving point.

Flashlight Fun – to develop the tracking of moving objects with both eyes focused on the moving point and to search and then focus on a point.

Near and Far – to develop the tracking of objects with both eyes on a shifting near and far focus point.

‘Spy Hole’


‘Pencil Push Ups’

Ball Swing Exercises – to develop the tracking of moving objects with both eyes focused on the moving point.

The games and activities provided are suitable for pre-school children as part of their natural developmental skills base development. They are also suitable for primary and secondary school aged children as part of a more focused approach to supporting these important physical skills areas.

Often motor memory skills are affected by poor visual memory abilities and many of the activities and games that develop motor memory skills will also support visual memory development.

Some spatial awareness skills issues can also be related to poor bilateral coordination Skills so games that support and develop this can also help to improve spatial awareness.

Other physical skills games and activities

Eye tracking games & activities

Spatial awareness games & activities

Motor memory games & activities

Visual memory games & activities

Eye tracking games and activities

Poor eye tracking skills can make handwriting very difficult, causing letter formation, spacing and positioning problems, leading to poor presentation. Often words are missed out or repeated, causing composition and legibility issues. The games and activities provided are suitable for pre and primary school children and help to develop eye tracking skills.

Eye tracking check & games

Spatial awareness games and activities

Poor spatial awareness skills make handwriting difficult as it affects the ability to understand and produce the directional pushes and pulls required to form letters; as well as difficulties with spacing and positioning. Combined, these difficulties can cause poor presentation and possible legibility issues. The games and activities provided are suitable for pre and primary school children and help to develop spatial awareness skills. Spatial awareness skills are also developed through some of the bilateral coordination games.

Spatial awareness check & games

Motor memory games and activities

Poor motor memory skills can make handwriting difficult as shapes and letter formation movements are often forgotten, causing letter reversals and incorrectly formed letter shapes, which can make joining a very slow process to learn. A poor and often slow handwriting style can develop as font styles are mixed and capital letters are used inappropriately. Combined, these difficulties can cause poor presentation, spelling and legibility issues. Often motor memory skills are affected by poor visual memory abilities and many activities and games that develop motor memory skills will also support visual memory development. The games and activities provided are suitable for pre and primary school children.

Motor memory check & games

Visual memory games and activities

Poor visual memory skills make handwriting difficult as the ability to recall how letters look and reproduce them with appropriate spacing and positioning is partially or completely lost. This leads to poor letter formation skills, letter reversal along with spelling and presentation difficulties. Due to the nature of our visual memory, and how we store that information, difficulties in this area also impact on motor memory skills. Many activities and games that develop visual memory also support motor memory skills. The games and activities provided are suitable for pre and primary school children.

Visual memory check & games Top