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Teach Handwriting

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The Four Essential Physical Strengths Children Need for Good Handwriting

Posture AssessmentA strong posture base helps with handwriting

This refers to the muscle groups that support the pelvis, trunk, shoulders and arms that provide a stable base so that a good sitting position can be maintained allowing the hands and fingers to move freely. These gross motor skills help your child’s sitting position, making handwriting more comfortable.

BCrossing the mid-line helps children write cross the page comfortably.ilateral Coordination Assessment

This refers to the use of left and right sides of the body, needed for coordination, well balanced movement, including those that require movements such as the left arm moving across the body to the right hand side. These gross motor skills let your child handwrite freely across the width of the paper.

Sensory Perception AssesGood sensory perception helps children hold a pencilsment

This relates to the body’s ability to send accurate messages to the brain relating to touch and being touched, as well as the movements and position of joints, limbs and muscles. These fine motor skills enable your child to hold a pencil correctly and apply the correct pressure when handwriting.

Hand and Finger Muscle AssessmentStrong hand and finger muscles help children manipulate the pencil to form letters.

This relates to the strength and agility of the hands and fingers so that your child can manipulate, coordinate and have the correct muscle tone for activities such as handwriting and using scissors. These fine motor skills help your child manipulate a pencil and thus form letter shapes.

To ensure your child has the strength to write comfortably and correctly, check their four key physical strengths.

The assessment has been designed to help you identify, and support, your child’s individual needs.

Print off the Assessment Sheet, then click on the sections below for the assessment activities.

Tips on assessing your child's strength

Having assessed your child, if they need to improve, there are further games and activities which you can use to help develop your child’s skills. If your child needs to improve in more than one area there are suggested Physical Ability Activity Programs to support them.


Assessment Sheet

How physical ability impacts handwriting